What Would an Ambassador for Women, Peace, and Security Mean for Canadian Women?

What Would an Ambassador for Women, Peace, and Security Mean for Canadian Women?

We don’t need more policy that’s appealing on paper but doesn’t meaningfully translate into practice. We can’t credibly claim to be a nation that represents peace and justice if we don’t pursue those values within our own borders. We need to have the integrity to look inward. 

Read More

Why Are Humanitarians Exploiting the People They're Supposed to Help?

Why Are Humanitarians Exploiting the People They're Supposed to Help?

Working for justice doesn’t mean we’ll always get it right, but we need to make the effort to maintain some sort of consistency. If you’re working to end human trafficking, you probably shouldn’t be buying slave-made chocolate or clothes. If you support women’s rights, you shouldn’t sexually exploit women and girls.

Read More

Should I Volunteer with an Anti-Trafficking Program?

Should I Volunteer with an Anti-Trafficking Program?

Unfortunately, the capacity to care doesn’t translate to an ability to navigate the complexity of anti-trafficking work. This is especially the case when working directly with survivors emerging from exploitation. Yet, this is often the focal point for would-be volunteers. They want to meet survivors and hear their stories, lavish victims with gifts, walk through Red Light Districts, or participate in rescue operations.

Read More

Why Shock Isn’t an Effective Campaign Tactic

Why Shock Isn’t an Effective Campaign Tactic

Shedding light on human rights issues is necessary, but there are better ways to go about it. You can’t fight violence by using violent images. You can’t claim you’re exposing an injustice while creating another. You can’t expect effective, meaningful change by turning people into pawns in an emotionally manipulative game.

Read More

True Justice Work Isn't Just Outrage

True Justice Work Isn't Just Outrage

Injustice should make us outraged, but it matters how we react to it. Responding by wishing AIDS on a person or punctuating a tweet with hashtags like #burn and #die hardly advances the work of justice. This kind of approach only fuels our “outrage economy” and turns the internet into an online battlefield, escalating already volatile issues and dividing people even further.

Read More